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What is Brain Neuroplasticity?

Learning extreme... © by ernstl

The term neuroplasticity, sometimes also referred to as “cortical plasticity or brain plasticity,” has become very popular in the past few years. Until recently, many experts believed that the brain’s neurological structures are set early in childhood and do not change much later on in life.

Recent research has proven that the brain continues to grow and to organize itself based on environmental influence and special needs. For instance, we know that individuals who have lost their sight will begin to use part of the visual cortex to process increasing flow of somatosensory information. We also know that individuals suffering with brain injury can develop new neurological connections to compensate for loss of function. A compromise in one hemisphere may result in the other hemisphere taking over to compensate for the deficiency. This unique ability of the brain to reorganize itself based on ongoing needs and demands proves its ability to continue to change and adapt, even as we grow older.

The brain continues to learn new patterns of behavior to be able to adjust to different environments in order to gain new skills required to do new jobs or to compensate for loss of function. Changes in behavior induce the production of new neurological connections. However, the brain has to be stimulated very specifically in order to create such changes. Just the fact that a person is interested in change is not enough to create change. There are four major keys to promote meaningful change:

1. Motivation to change

2. Learning new skills

3. Challenging yourself to go beyond comfort level

4. Repetition in order to reinforce changes and make them permanent.

Improving memory, even after deterioration as a result of aging or as a result of injury is based on the brain’s ability to improve self-regulation and general function, which what neuroplasticity is really about.

This memory course makes good use of the brain’s amazing ability to change and adapt. Your desire to improve, combined with the new skills and challenging exercises taught to you here will enable you to achieve the goal of improving your focus and memory regardless of what caused these mental faculties to deteriorate in the first place.

Copyright (c) Bob Gottfried, PhD. Taken from “The Revolutionary Memory Course: Dramatically Improve your Memory & Concentration in 6 weeks or less!

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